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Establishing Shot ( ES )

  • Letting your audience know where you are going and the location.
  • Conveying to the audience where the scene is taking place.
  • Similar to a wide shot (WS).
  • This shot is an easy way to communicate to the audience without the need of clarification by the means of for example a voice over.

 

   Extreme Close up ( ECU )

  • An extreme close up puts emphasis on the thing you are focusing on.
  • It completely draws your attention to the thing you are focusing on, meaning that the audience decodes that the thing being focused on so closely must be of extreme importance in the scene.
  • Allows you to see every single detail. For example in my example above you can see every freckle and each individual eyelash. Again, this draws the audience completely into what you want them to focus on.

 

 Close Up ( CU )

  • Although a close up is slightly further away than an extreme close up, it still allows you to see all of the emotion in a persons face.
  • This shot is often used when trying to convey emotion, as the audience is able to see every feature in the face, and so any small change in facial expression is picked up.
  • Close ups also draw the audience completely in on the thing in question, meaning the focus is completely on that person.

 

Medium Close Up ( MCU ) 

  • This shot usually cuts across the chest, focusing more in onto the person.
  • This shot shows the face closely, but isn’t uncomfortably close in any way, so in most cases is used more often than ( for example ) the extreme close up.
  • This shot allows the audience to see some of what the character is wearing so this shot can completely change the semiology of the scene.

 

Mid Shot ( MS )

  • The mid shot cuts around the middle of the person.
  • It shows emotion and is focusing in more on the person, yet it is far enough away to be able to take in other things in the scene. For example in this shot although Chantal is very much the focus of the image, you can also take in some of the background.

 

Medium Long Shot ( MLS )    

  • In a medium long shot you see most of the body.
  • Tends to focus less on emotion and more on other things, such as props, clothing and posture.
  • it helps show the person in context with the surroundings.

 

  

Long Shot ( LS )

  • Seeing the whole body in one shot.
  • You can clearly see the character in relation to the surroundings.
  • This shot allows the audience to see all of the persons clothing. Because semiology is extremely important, having this type of shot can be really helpful in a scene to give the audience a complete view of the character.

 

Dutch Angle ( DA )      

  • A dutch angle is often used to show something as ‘confusing’ or ‘not in balance’.
  • It can make an audience feel uneasy, and can change the whole atmosphere of a scene in a second.
  • a Dutch angle can also be used to show disorientation or possibly the change in emotion of a character.

 

Low Angle Shot ( LAS )

  • Low angle shots are often used to make the character seem  more in control.
  • They are also used to make the character look intimidating, and as if they are looking down at the person they are talking to/ the audience.

 

High Angle Shot ( HAS )    

  • High angle shots are most commonly used to make the subject seem small, weak and vulnerable.

 

Rule of Thirds in Film: learn how applying the ” Rule of Thirds” will drastically improve your images ‘cgdirector’ (2011)

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My Own Photograph ( Taken 26th September 2016 )

The Rule Of Thirds

The rule of thirds is a way of you thinking about where to place your characters within a scene. The most visually appealing place to put your characters in a scene is often on the intersection of the lines. This technique is extremely common in interviews (to make the viewer feel like they are looking in on the conversation).

For example in this scene from ‘The Incredibles’ (Brad Bird 2004) Mr Incredible has been placed in the intersection, creating a more aesthetically pleasing scene.

 

 Hit the Front Lines in 20 New Marvel’s ‘Captain America: Civil War’ Photos Cavanaugh, P. (2016)

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My Own Photograph ( Taken 26th September 2016 )

Leading Lines

Leading lines are mainly natural lines that draw the consumer in. For example if you wanted to focus in on a person and bring them to the audiences attention you could use leading lines to ‘lead’ the audiences eye straight to the character.

For example in this scene Captain America: Civil War (Joe Russo 2016) the audience will automatically focus on Captain America because the light and banister are leading your eyes directly towards him.

 

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Symmetry, Kubrick Style. (Kubrick // One Point Perspective / edited by kogonada) Anna (2012)

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My Own Photograph ( Taken 26th September 2016 )

 Symmetry

Symmetry can be extremely pleasant to look at. It adds a lot more weight to the image, and can really please the audiences eye.

For example in this scene from ‘The Shining’ (Stanley Kubrick 1980) the two identically twins are holding hands. Practically everything in this scene is symmetrical. This is really effective as it builds tension and confuses the audience.

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND review. Goldberg, M. (2010)

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My Own Photograph ( Taken 26th September 2016 )

Depth

Depth is extremely important when trying to create an effective scene. This means using each dimension as much as you can to try to convey information. It is important to also focus on the background and how it can be used effectively. Depth means that you don’t just focus on the subject, but you also show the audience what is in the background, as this is also very important.

For example in this scene from ‘Alice In Wonderland’ (Tim Burton 2010)  you can clearly see The Mad Hatter, but you can also see the mass of guards behind him. This is really effective as although we are drawn to the Hatter, we can also see the danger that is awaiting him.

 

MARTIN FREEMAN as the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins in the fantasy adventure “THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY,” a production of New Line Cinema and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures (MGM), released by Warner Bros. Pictures and MGM.

The Hobbit & The Dawn of High Frame Rate Cinema. (Kaufman, D.)

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My Own Photograph ( Taken 26th September 2016 )

Natural Framing

Natural framing happens naturally in the environment that can frame a scene effectively.

For example in this scene from ‘The Hobbit’ (Peter Jackson 2012) we see Bilbo Baggins running through some sort alley. This scene is framed perfectly using natural framing.

 

 

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Perfect amount of depth in THE SOCIAL NETWORK (Pike, 2010)  

Depth of Field

Depth of field is often used to emphasise a person or thing in a scene.

 

Harvard Referencing:

 

Anna (2012) ‘Symmetry, Kubrick Style. (Kubrick // One Point Perspective / edited by kogonada)’ Available at: http://www.doorsixteen.com/2012/08/31/symmetry-kubrick-style/ ( Last accessed: 24th September 2016 )

‘cgdirector’ (2011) ‘Rule of Thirds in FIlm: learn how applying the ” Rule of Thirds” will drastically improve your images.’ Available at:  http://www.cgdirector.com/learn-how-applying-the-rule-of-thirds-will-drastically-improve-your-renders/ ( Last accessed: 24th September 2016 )

Cavanaugh, P. (2016) ‘Hit the Front Lines in 20 New Marvel’s ‘Captain America: Civil War’ Photos.’ Available at: http://marvel.com/news/movies/25871/hit_the_front_lines_in_20_new_marvels_captain_america_civil_war_photos ( Last accessed: 24th September 2016 )

Goldberg, M. (2010) ‘ALICE IN WONDERLAND review.’ Available at: http://collider.com/alice-in-wonderland-review/ (Last Accessed: 24th September 2016)

Kaufman, D. (no date) ‘The Hobbit & The Dawn of High Frame Rate Cinema.’ Available at: https://library.creativecow.net/kaufman_debra/Hobbit-High-Frame-Rate-Cinema/1 ( Last accessed: 23rd September 2016 )

Pike, C. (2010) ‘Using Depth Of Field For Storytelling.’ Available at:  http://dslrvideoshooter.com/using-depth-of-field-for-storytelling/ ( Last accessed: 24th September 2016 )

 

 

 

 

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